Tax Deductions for Hosts

As a host for rental properties, you should claim the below tax deductions to keep more of your hard-earned money.

Mileage you can deduct

Work-related errands
Miles driven to pick up supplies, advertising assets, or other work-related errands are tax deductible.
Between property visits
Miles driven between properties, and from your last property visit to your home office, are tax deductible.

Expenses you can deduct

Cleaning Supplies
Supplies like cleaning products, rags, and paper towels that you buy for work are deductible.
Office Supplies
Items that you buy for everyday use in your office, like pens, paper, postage, and notepads, are deductible!
Business Cards
Designing and printing business cards is deductible as a marketing expense. Just be sure to check for typos!
Advertising
The costs of promoting your business--like online ads, signs, print, radio, and video--are all deductible!
Licenses & Memberships
Licenses or memberships that help you do your job are deductible. That includes license renewal fees and membership dues to professional organizations.
Supplies
If you purchase supplies that are needed to run your business, those expenses are deductible! Just make sure these purchases would be considered typical for your industry.
Legal Fees
A good contract can save you hours of headaches... for a price. Be sure to record your business related legal expenses as deductions!
Cleaning Services
Call in the cleaners! Maid-services, professional cleaners, carpet cleaning, landscaping, and any labor you hire to keep your property in shape qualifies as a business deduction.
Commissions
Hosting fees and commissions on Airbnb, VRBO, Zillow, and other sites are all deductible.
Homeowner's Insurance
Protect your investment. The business percentage of your homeowner's insurance is a deductible expense.
Mortgage Interest
A business percentage of interest you pay to finance your property is tax deductible. Payments of principal, however, are not.
Home Repairs
Repairs that maintain your property without increasing its value can be deducted. However, home improvements, renovations, restorations, and additions all should be claimed elsewhere as capital improvements.
Management Fees
It's due time! Homeowner's association dues, and fees paid to professional property managers, are big ticket deductions!
Property Taxes
Claim the business percentage of the property taxes you pay.
Occupancy Taxes
If you remit occupancy taxes on behalf of your guests, you can claim these as a deduction.
Utilities
Save those bills and deduct a business percentage of what you pay for heat, electricity, water, waste removal, phone, television, and internet.
Property Rent
Deduct a business percentage of the rent you pay for properties that you rent out to guests.

Other expenses you can deduct

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Non-Deductible Expenses

Clothing
Clothing that can be reasonably worn outside of your work enviornment is considered a personal hygene expense and is explicitly deemed a non-deductible expense.
Haircuts
A haircut is considered a personal hygiene expense and is explicitly deemed a non-deductible expense for independent workers.
Life Insurance
You can't deduct the cost of premiums for life insurance where you are the beneficiary. This includes taking policies out to secure a loan for your business, or to fund a succession plan.
Parking Fines and Tickets
Misconduct isn't part of your job! Fees for legal violations, such as parking tickets or court fees, are not tax deductible.
Commuting
If you have a permanent office from which you conduct your business then the miles driven between your home and that office are considered commuting and are not tax deductible.
Dry Cleaning
Dry cleaning is considered a personal hygiene expense and is therefore explicitly deemed a non-deductible. Unless you're cleaning a uniform, the expense is considered personal.

Non-Deductible Expenses if You Take the Standard Mileage Deduction

Gas
Gas is part of maintaining a vehicle for business and is deductible only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate.
Oil Change
An oil change is standard car maintenence and so is deductible only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate.
Car Insurance
Car insurance is required for all car owners and thus is deductible only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate.
Car Repairs
All cars will eventually need a repair. Repairs are deductible only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate.
Car Lease Payments
If you are leasing a car, you can deduct the lease payments only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate.
Car Depreciation
Car depreciation is deductible only if you choose not to take the standard mileage rate. Total allowed may be reduced if business use falls under 50%.

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